Topic Physicians & workforce

Articles

Healthcare Providers: Preparing for the next normal after COVID-19

The length of disruption for patients continuing physical distancing remains unclear. However, most forward-looking healthcare organizations may use this time to materially scale virtual health offerings in ways that create competitive advantage.

Articles

Major challenges remain in COVID-19 testing

There remain challenges and risk in considering “widespread testing” as the sole criterion for returning to work and activities.

Articles

From “wartime” to “peacetime”: Five stages for healthcare institutions in the battle against COVID-19

Healthcare has found itself tested by the pandemic. The frontlines are delivering heroically, but the next normal for healthcare will look nothing like the normal we leave behind.

Articles

Winning the (local) COVID-19 war

As governors, mayors and other leaders work to protect lives and livelihoods, they will need to confront this enemy across six domains, pressing hard to safeguard industries, and using data to adapt based on ‘the facts on the ground’.

Articles

Returning to resilience: The impact of COVID-19 on mental health and substance use

As governments race to contain COVID-19, it is important to know the actions society can take to mitigate the behavioral health impact of the pandemic and economic crisis.

Articles

Critical care capacity: The number to watch during the battle of COVID-19

Since the explosion of COVID-19, most countries have put in place public health measures to “flatten the curve” and accepted the concomitant economic pull back. But there is another number everyone should watch now: the capacity in hospitals to deliver critical care in intensive care units (ICU) with ventilators. It is the metric that indicates whether hospital systems will be overwhelmed.

Multimedia

Helping US healthcare stakeholders understand the human side of the COVID-19 crisis: McKinsey Consumer Healthcare Insights

Healthcare stakeholders on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic must understand not only the disease itself, but also consumers’ questions, concerns, and behaviors. Our recent rapid-research effort in the US provides some early insights.

Articles

Understanding the impact of unmet social needs on consumer health and healthcare

Income, employment, education, food security, housing, transportation, safety, and social support are all factors that affect health and well-being.

Articles

Promoting an overdue digital transformation in healthcare

Research from over 30 countries offers insight into providing digital healthcare, including practical steps for key stakeholders.

Articles

For better healthcare claims management, think “digital first”

Although end-to-end digital claims management is still a distant vision, much can be gained from digitizing portions of the claims process today.

Multimedia

The journey to a new tomorrow: A conversation with Ron Kuerbitz, CEO, agilon health

Ron Kuerbitz, Chief Executive Officer, agilon health, shares his perspective on consolidation of the sector, the role of technology, and what he’s most excited about for the future. He spoke with Neha Patel, Partner, McKinsey & Company in December 2018.

Articles

The productivity imperative for healthcare delivery in the United States

Healthcare is a key component of the US economy, but healthcare spending increases consistently outstrips GDP growth. Improving productivity in healthcare delivery could change this dynamic without harming patient care.

Multimedia

Planning for the future of healthcare: A conversation with Penny Wheeler, President and CEO, Allina Health

Penny Wheeler, President and CEO, Allina Health shares her perspective on the importance of partnerships in increasing value and understanding the consumer with Jenny Cordina, Partner, McKinsey and Company in an interview conducted in June 2017.

Multimedia

Insights on radiology spend

Radiology is essential to patient care, but where there's variation in spend, there's potential opportunity for payers to decrease costs.

Multimedia

Planning for the future of healthcare: a conversation with Benjamin Breier, President and CEO, Kindred Healthcare

Benjamin Breier, President and CEO, Kindred Healthcare shares his perspective on major trends in US healthcare and the value of an integrated approach with Shubham Singhal, Senior Partner, McKinsey and Company.

Articles

Escaping the turnaround trap

Done well, a recovery phase can be used as a catalyst—or jolt—to move a hospital trust towards a sustainable improvement in performance. Done poorly, it can leave the trust in a “turnaround trap”.

Multimedia

Planning for the future of healthcare—Marc Harrison, President and CEO, Intermountain Healthcare

Marc Harrison, President and CEO, Intermountain Healthcare shares his perspective on overcoming challenges and his leadership priorities with Brendan Buescher, Senior Partner, McKinsey and Company.

Articles

Beating the odds: Hiring and retaining an RN workforce to optimize patient outcomes and minimize unnecessary expense

Effective workforce management can increase RN retention, reduce absenteeism, and improve patient outcomes and experience. Here's how to get ahead of emerging challenges.

Articles

The next imperatives for US healthcare

Two steps—increasing healthcare-sector productivity and improving healthcare-market functioning to better balance the supply of and demand for health services—would likely produce sufficient savings to lower medical cost inflation to the rate of GDP growth.

Articles

Achieving ROI from EHRs: Actionable insights that can transform care delivery

Traditional arguments for EHR implementation such as efficiency gains and meaningful-use incentives are insufficient to maximize a health system’s returns on its technology investments. However, clinically and operationally oriented sources of value can generate an additional $10,000 to $20,000 per bed in annual margin.

Articles

Clinically integrated networks: Can they create value?

Although structurally simple to create, clinically integrated networks (CINs) are difficult to get right. Health systems considering establishing CINs must think through what it truly takes to create value through these entities and then make sure they have designed the CINs appropriately.

Articles

The access imperative

Improving outpatient access can deliver a triple win for payors, providers, and patients.

Short take

Optimizing the nursing skill mix: A win for nurses, patients, and hospitals

An evolved approach to RN staffing, optimizing the nursing skill mix leads to lower costs, improved RN satisfaction and better patient outcomes. Here's how to get from 'here' to 'there.'

Articles

The post-reform health system: Meeting the challenges ahead

This series of articles examines transformational imperatives specific to health systems in the post-reform era, drawing on extensive work with healthcare stakeholders across the value chain.

Articles

Engaging physicians to transform operational and clinical performance

Health systems (and health plans) that are serious about transforming themselves must harness the energy of their physicians. To do so, they must develop a true ability to engage physicians effectively.

Articles

Creating and sustaining change in nursing care delivery

By giving nurses more control over their work environment and more opportunities for professional advancement, hospitals and health systems can reduce nurse turnover, lower costs, and improve patient care.

Articles

How to improve clinical behavior in primary care

Getting physicians to make significant changes to their day-to-day activities can be difficult. But the result can be better patient outcomes and lower healthcare costs.

Reports

Accounting for the cost of U.S. healthcare: Pre-reform trends and the impact of the recession (2011)

This report analyzes US healthcare spending trends overall and by category of care, and compares US healthcare expenditures with other developed countries.

Reports

Accounting for the cost of US healthcare: A new look at why Americans spend more (2008)

At the time of publication, the United States spent $650 billion more on healthcare than expected, even when adjusting for the economy’s relative wealth. This report examines the underlying trends and key drivers of these higher costs.