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What can states do to change key parameters of the individual market?

In part II of this February 2017 conversation, Erica Coe and Stephanie Carlton of the McKinsey Center for US Health System Reform discuss this question with Thomas Barker, former General Counsel at the Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and Ken Choe, a former Deputy General Counsel and Counselor to the Office of Health Reform at HHS. Mr. Barker is now a partner and co-chair of the Healthcare Practice at Foley Hoag. Mr. Choe is now a partner at Hogan Lovells.

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Winning in private health insurance through technical excellence

In private health insurance, a focus on technical excellence in product development, pricing, underwriting, and claims handling can improve insurers’ bottom line—while easing their dependence on investment returns.

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Potential impact of individual market reforms

A wide range of changes to stabilize the individual market have been proposed. This special report examines the impact some of the initiatives could have on claims costs and enrollment by the uninsured.

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Next-generation contracting: Managed Medicaid for individuals with special or supportive care needs

This new framework can help states improve their ability to design and contract for managed Medicaid programs for these individuals—and maximize the programs’ likelihood of success.

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Global private payors: A trillion-euro growth industry

Four fundamental forces (risk, technology, regulation, and consumerism) are disrupting the overall trillion-euros-in-revenue global private health insurance market—a market experiencing substantial growth. Private payors must act on the imperatives resulting from these forces if they are to capitalize on the opportunities and avoid obsolescence.

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Navigating the uncertainty of potential ACA ‘repeal and replace’: A preliminary analysis

The findings in this Intelligence Brief provide an introductory perspective on how the next US administration and Congressional Republicans may approach altering the ACA and related legislation. The information is based on publicly reported information released through December 8, 2016. Our Reform Center team is continuing to refresh this perspective on a real-time basis and is closely analyzing potential implications and economic impacts for each policy element under a full range of scenarios.